Originally Published: Monday, 19 June 2000 Author: Jeff Alami
Published to: columnists/Jeff Alami Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

Letters to the Editor: Part 3

A great deal of interesting comments have been sent to Linux.com over time. Here are a few of the letters written by our readers. If you'd like to see your letter in this column, please send your comments and questions about Linux.com or Linux in general to letters@linux.com.

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A great deal of interesting comments have been sent to Linux.com over time. Here are a few of the letters written by our readers. If you'd like to see your letter in this column, please send your comments and questions about Linux.com or Linux in general to letters@linux.com.

Mac Service

We have some Macintoshes in our office, and I like to know if it is possible to install a Linux server that supports a Mac service to let us to share a hard disk of the NT server for them through Linux. NT supports a Mac service, but every time we tried to install the Mac service on the NT server, our company's entire network crashed.

--Roberto Romita

One of Linux' strengths is interoperability. Linux can access and share files using numerous protocols, including NFS, SMB, and, yes, AppleTalk used by Macintoshes. One such implementation, dubbed netatalk, is available for Linux and other Unix platforms. The recommended way to download netatalk is through patches made by Adrian Sun, available for download at ftp://ftp.cobaltnet.com/pub/users/asun/. For what you're looking to do, you would want to mount the shared NT files as a directory on the Linux server, and then share that directory via netatalk. It's a bit of a workaround but it's certainly possible.

Which Version?

I am really fed up with Microsoft Windows. I was wondering which version of Linux would be best for me to use on a PC. I am not on a network; I would just use it for personal usage to replace Windows as my OS.

--Anonymous

There are many distributions of Linux available, and some cater to the new users. Some of these distributions include Caldera OpenLinux, Corel Linux, and Linux-Mandrake. You can find out more about the various Linux distributions at our Linux Distributions page. For new users, we've also answered a few of the most common questions. Enjoy your Linux experience!

Palm Tops

I was wondering if there was a way to put Linux on my palm top Windows CE machine. I have an $899.00 paperweight right now because Windows CE is worthless. I bought a Phenom H220-C, with a 33MHz processor, 32MB of RAM, a 640x480 screen, standard parallel port and monitor port, and a 56k modem. I am especially interested in putting Linux on so I can use a real browser, so it must support the modem and also the touch screen (touch screen optional if I can key control it). With the Linux kernel being so small, I figure some one would have ported it to the handhelds by now.

--Anonymous

There's an interesting list of resources for palmtops on the Linux on Laptops page. There you'll find information about the status of Linux ports to handhelds designed to run Windows CE as well as PalmPilots and Psion handhelds. Because of the nature of handhelds it's quite a hack to put Linux on these machines, but it's worth a try.

Thank you for taking the time to write these letters. Remember that we do edit them for spelling, grammar, and length, and we credit your name. Send your letters to letters@linux.com.

Jeff Alami, jeff@linux.com





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