Originally Published: Sunday, 16 April 2000 Author: Jeff White
Published to: featured_articles/Featured Articles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

Your Opinion Matters

Without you, Linux would not be what it is today. Because we have such strong, anti-Linux and pro-Linux communities, we have the most phenomenally progressive operating system and resources available, free of cost, to date.

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It seems to me that people fail to realize whether they are anti-Linux or pro-Linux, and that their opinions mold the future of Linux. There is no possible way that Linux could continue to grow without the feedback, comments and opinions expressed by its users.

When it comes down to it, Linux developers cannot develop an operating system for anyone but themselves unless they know what needs to be improved in the eyes of their users. It would seem redundant for an operating system to exist without the support from its users. With support always comes regressive feedback. Developers, and the Linux community in general, must realize that negative feedback, comments, and opinions should be considered an asset.

Think about it for a moment; if no one commented and opinionated themselves in the Linux computing world, how could Linux have come this far? Whether you are an expert, novice or new computing user, your opinion on how Linux should look, work, act and feel will mold the way that Linux is developed. Linux would not be as great an operating system without both the positive and negative opinions of users. It is up to you, the end user, to affect whether Linux will continue to strive in technology or fade away like most "fads" do.

Without you, Linux would not be what it is today. Because we have such strong, anti-Linux and pro-Linux communities, we have the most phenomenally progressive operating system and resources available, free of cost, to date.

Because our opinions should mean everything to our Linux developers, for if they didn't they would be developing an operating system and resource for a very small and finite group of users, we can mold the way Linux takes shape. If you don't like how GIMP feels compared to Adobe Photoshop or if you simply dislike how file browsing is so differentiated from the simplicity of Windows Explorer, we need to know how to improve and make you happy. Better computing means efficient computing, which revolves around content end users that no longer need to waste thought process on "why the heck does this thing keep giving me an illegal operation or core dump."

I do not know whether there is a site devoted to the opinions of users, both pro-Linux and anti-Linux, where developers, technologists, specialists and end users can read, experience and reflect upon the never-ending battle of dominance in technology, but I would love to contribute. No longer can some entity dictate on how technology is to be; we, the end user, have the choice on whether or not to accept such an opposing and proficient advance in the computing world. We can make it or break it. When it comes down to the final decision, it's up to you. I leave you with a question, that perhaps the Linux developers and commercial entities should pay heed: "What changes would you make to Linux for it to be everything you need in an operating system and computing environment?"

Coincidentally, I would love to see Novell become more involved with Linux. It annoys me how I must resort to a Microsoft operating system in order to administer my NetWare servers. Why do I not have a choice in which operating system I choose to administer them?

You can reach me via E-mail at phive@linux.com or IRC at irc.darkenwood.org | #dw





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