Originally Published: Friday, 31 March 2000 Author: Craig Bamford
Published to: enhance_articles_hardware/Hardware Articles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

A Little Linux Praise

Have you ever had a hard drive go bad, covered in bad sectors, losing all your data? If so I truly sympathize with you. I have been through more hard drives than I care to remember, lost to bad sectors. Thankfully Linus and friends thought about this problem and have dealt with it very effectively.

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Have you ever had a hard drive go bad, covered in bad sectors, losing all your data? If so I truly sympathize with you. I have been through more hard drives than I care to remember, lost to bad sectors. Thankfully Linus and friends thought about this problem and have dealt with it very effectively.

The way that Windows deals with bad sectors is to scan the surface of the drive, mark sectors as 'bad' and then 'avoid' them while writing and reading data. Regardless of the effort exerted by the more popular operating system, it fails to find a good solution to this problem. This cycle consists of marking the bad sectors then failing to totally avoid using those sectors, resulting in increased bad sectors and data loss. There is nothing more frustrating than to sit there and watch as the contents of your hard drive are wiped away.

In my Linux system I currently have a Western Digital 4.3 GB hard drive that contains 20 or so bad sectors. These were discovered when I ran Scandisk on that drive via Windows 95. At first there was one, but soon more and more developed. I was eventually forced to partition part of the drive off, because of the damage. Finally, a friend told me that Linux dealt with bad sectors practically flawlessly, which I was soon to discover myself.

I have been running Linux on that particular hard drive for around 5 months now. I have not lost any data, the operating system runs perfectly, and I have not had to worry about more bad sectors surfacing. I truly thank the developers for designing Linux in such a way, for it has been a true savior to my dying hard drive.

If you have any stories, or problems to tell of your hardware and Linux, as a new user, please feel free to e-mail me, Craig Bamford, and tell me about them. I am constantly learning and I would like to learn from your experiences as well as my own. Once again, I thank you for your continued attention, and I hope to continue bringing you tales of the New User.

Microsoft is copyright of Microsoft Corporation, 2000. Microsoft Windows 95 is copyright of Microsoft Corporation, 2000. Western Digital is copyright of Western Digital Corporation, 2000.





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