Originally Published: Wednesday, 8 March 2000 Author: Paul Gray
Published to: interact_articles_lugs/Articles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

LUG Vendor Review - Coriolis

If it is true that a picture is worth a thousand words, then each volume in Coriolis' "Visual Black Book" series is equivalent to an encyclopedia set. "Setting Up a Linux Intranet Server" by Tsuji and Watanabe is one of the thinner books on Linux topics yet manages to be quite thorough in its breadth.

The book's goal is to walk the reader through the necessary configurations involved in setting up an local area network (LAN). The topics covered include managing users, printing and file-sharing setups between Macintosh and Windows clients, DHCP configuration, creating web access for the local network, managing mail, and general issues associated with maintaining Linux in a server capacity.


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Book Review

  • Title: "Setting up a Linux Intranet Server, Visual Black Book"
  • Authors: Hide Tsuji and Takashi Watanabe
  • Publishers: Coriolis and Impress
  • Book Series: CoriolisOpen Press
  • SBN: 1-57610-568-7
  • Reviewer: Paul Gray, Cedar Valley Linux Group (CedarLUG) faculty advisor

If it is true that a picture is worth a thousand words, then each volume in Coriolis' "Visual Black Book" series is equivalent to an encyclopedia set. "Setting Up a Linux Intranet Server" by Tsuji and Watanabe is one of the thinner books on Linux topics yet manages to be quite thorough in its breadth.

The book's goal is to walk the reader through the necessary configurations involved in setting up an local area network (LAN). The topics covered include managing users, printing and file-sharing setups between Macintosh and Windows clients, DHCP configuration, creating web access for the local network, managing mail, and general issues associated with maintaining Linux in a server capacity. The approach taken by the authors is very straight-forward, walking you through the setup and configuration of a local Class-C network. The book takes you from installation of RedHat 6.0 through the complete network configuration of the local network, 192.168.1.0, using the domain "coriolis.com".

The configuration of Samba, DHCP, sendmail, and such are significantly simplified by pointing the reader to pre-configured settings files located on Coriolis' ftp server. While this does not do these topics full justice, it does provide the first-time LAN manager with the ability to rapidly establish a rudimentary (and working) network skeleton with which to build upon to suit more specific networking characteristics.

The book is very well suited for newcomers to network management as well as newcomers to Linux. This book would be extremely useful to an IT manager of a Windows NT office place given the directive from higher-ups to move to a more cost-effective solution using Linux. Using the plan of attack presented by the authors, the IT manager would have little problem installing, configuring, and connecting both Windows and Macintosh components (computers and printers) to her new Linux-based sever.

While overall the book is quite solid and useful, there are some places in the text where comments seem out of place or allude to a nonexistent accompanying CD instead of files downloaded from Coriolis' ftp site. These anomalies in the text are likely due to the translation of the original Japanese text. Further, the content devoted to walking the user through RedHat 6.0 installations unnecessarily time-stamps the otherwise current material of the book.

In summary, this is a wonderful, handy book for anyone interested in adding any or all features like Samba, Netatalk, or DHCP to their existing LAN.





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