Originally Published: Friday, 17 December 1999 Author: Jeff Alami
Published to: columnists/Jeff Alami Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

Letters to the Editor: Part 1

After announcing the new Letters to the Editor section, I was swamped with interesting letters from Linux.com readers. I guess I deserved it. The letters came mostly from people who are beginners to the operating system, and wanted to know more about Linux and the GNU system. Here are a few of the letters that were sent. Remember, send your letters to letters@linux.com!...

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After announcing the new Letters to the Editor section, I was swamped with interesting letters from Linux.com readers. I guess I deserved it. The letters came mostly from people who are beginners to the operating system, and wanted to know more about Linux and the GNU system. Here are a few of the letters that were sent. Remember, send your letters to letters@linux.com!

I Like It!

As far as I am concerned, I think Linux is a great idea. I don't have any skill at all with Linux so far, but I will acquire it. The idea of people controlling the OS that they use and sharing programs will promote learning and knowledge everywhere. My best wishes to all in the Linux community.

James Sadler

About Linux.com

As a new user (6 months) I want to thank the staff at Linux.com for a great site. It is my Netscape's default web page. Keep up the great work. I have contact with just one other Linux user so you are my "connection" to Linux. One question: how, as a Linux user, can I put pressure on hardware manufacturers to include Linux software with products that they sell?

Herb Wood

If you're not a Linux device driver developer, one way to put pressure on hardware manufacturers that do not support Linux is to not buy the product. As our numbers increase, this sort of pressure will be more and more pronounced, and hardware makers will see no other choice but to be open to Linux support. Now, actually including Linux drivers with their hardware isn't as important as having Linux drivers available by download, but that would be a bonus.

Talking of Scripting Languages

Linux is great and getting better since it's not "free" anymore. I was surprised to *not* see MetaCard among the recent script language poll. As opposed to all others mentioned there it's not free although a "demo" with limited numbers of lines per object is available for free. Also it is multi-platform it has a learnable language, even by those with a life ;-), and full support for GUI. If you don't know about it give it a try (metacard.com) and do a service to the Linux scripting community. 2.3beta has support among other things for sockets. I'm not related to the company who makes it, I'm a user.

Andu

Linux and the GNU system was, is, and will always be free. When we mean "free" we mean you have freedoms to use, modify, and redistribute the software -- it doesn't refer to price. Our scripting languages poll includes the most popular and widely used scripting languages for GNU/Linux.

What's All the Hype About Linux?

Hello to all you Linux lovers. I confess I am one of the millions of Linux newbies out there. I got a hold of a Caldera OpenLinux 2.3 Cheapbytes disk and after a smooth installation, I am opened to whole new world. But unfortunately that whole facade of functionality, whether it be KDE, Gnome, or Enlightenment is very deceiving. To date I don't have soundbytes (like I could with Desktop themes on Windows98), I seem to connect to my ISP after I configured kppp but that little graphical icon at the top-right of Netscape hypnotizes you with those meteor showers and pretty soon a half hour passed by and Yahoo.com has still not loaded. Some items in menus seem to be just there for decoration and they do not bring up anything. I could go on and on with a lot of these annoyances and the bottom line is just keep Linux where it needs to be as inexpensive web servers where I believe it tops those other servers like NT and the like. Sorry.

Tobby Tohhe

Slackware

Hi. I frequently browse your site for information and utilities. One question though. I'm always reading about Red Hat. I started with Slackware Linux and was wondering if there will ever be any coverage for that Linux distribution. Are companies interested in Slackware or do they generally go with the most popular name out there on the market? Please let readers know this.

Derek Mrkobrada

Red Hat is the most popular and well-known distribution of GNU/Linux out there. And if there's one thing about companies, it's that they tend to go for the popular and the well-known. Of course, you have to remember that when you see a press release saying something like "Joe Software Ports Product to Red Hat Linux," Joe Software's product will most likely work on another distribution.

Once again, thank you for taking the time to write these letters. Remember that we do edit them for spelling and grammar, and we credit your name. Send your comments and questions about Linux.com or Linux in general to letters@linux.com.

Jeff Alami, jeff@linux.com.





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