Originally Published: Thursday, 3 February 2000 Author: Jeff Alami
Published to: featured_articles/Featured Articles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

LinuxWorld Conference and Expo: Day 2

LinuxWorld Conference and Expo has the distinction of being the first major Linux event held after the first wave of Linux IPO's. There's more confidence in the air at this event, as more people accept the inevitability of open source, and the market success of Linux. Linux is established, but we have managed to keep our community throughout the process. Five years ago, a geek would tell you, "run Linux, not Windows." Nowadays, a geek would tell you, "run Debian, not Red Hat." [1]...

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LinuxWorld Conference and Expo has the distinction of being the first major Linux event held after the first wave of Linux IPO's. There's more confidence in the air at this event, as more people accept the inevitability of open source, and the market success of Linux. Linux is established, but we have managed to keep our community throughout the process. Five years ago, a geek would tell you, "run Linux, not Windows." Nowadays, a geek would tell you, "run Debian, not Red Hat." [1]

The day began with the keynote by Dr. Larry Augustin, VA Linux Systems' CEO. The spirit of the keynote was that Open Source is inevitable because it is more economically efficient. Open Source software also belongs to the user, not a single company, so it's an empowering technology.

They keynote also featured a demonstration of the Trillian project, for which the Linux kernel source code for the IA-64 was released yesterday. What's impressive is that Linux for the hardware architecture is available now, before the hardware itself has been made publicly available. Larry Augustin and Intel representatives demonstrated an Itanium engineering prototype natively running Internet services such as Apache, Samba, and Sendmail. Linux on the IA-64 is also able to run IA-32 (i386) applications, such as the well-known productivity suite -- Doom.

Augustin introduced SourceForge to the audience, defining it as the "development center" of the Open Source community. Services that SourceForge provides includes project hosting, source archival, CVS, and forums. An categorized application index is available for the public to find the applications that they need. Augustin said that he himself was looking for a tax application, and he found a GNU tax program that works with GNOME. It was called "GnoGnuTaxes." Also, Augustin made the announcement that VA Linux Systems has acquired Andover.Net.

After the keynote, I checked out the latest developments going on at VMware. They are about to release version 2.0 of their virtualization application which allows operating systems to run concurrently. VMware 2.0's most notable feature is the Suspend option, which allows the user to suspend their virtual session into memory. This means you can suspend a Windows session, close VMware completely, turn off the computer, ship the computer somewhere, turn it on, open VMware, and return to the Windows session exactly where you left off. This ability is extraordinary, and I'm starting to believe that these people are genius hackers. VMware 2.0 is set to be released sometime in March.

Jeff Alami (jeff@linux.com) is the Editor-in-Chief of Linux.com, and runs from booth to booth at Linux tradeshows, looking for the most important news. He is also obligated to cover the tradeshow parties, but he finds himself much more motivated regarding that aspect of a tradeshow.

Footnote
[1] Courtesy Emmett Plant, Slashdot.





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