Originally Published: Saturday, 1 January 2000 Author: Jeff Alami
Published to: featured_articles/Featured Articles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

Linux Distribution Y2K Updates

The much-anticipated year 2000 has finally dawned upon us. Fortunately, the possibility of computer problems has not materialised into anything serious. There were inconveniences, and it's possible that several more inconveniences are yet to come. Linux distribution vendors have included updates to their packages that will minimise the chance of these inconveniences....

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The much-anticipated year 2000 has finally dawned upon us. Fortunately, the possibility of computer problems has not materialised into anything serious. There were inconveniences, and it's possible that several more inconveniences are yet to come. Linux distribution vendors have included updates to their packages that will minimise the chance of these inconveniences.

Red Hat posted a couple fixes for packages that weren't Y2K ready. The libtiff, groff, and sharutils packages have been upgraded with Y2K fixes. Check Red Hat's Errata page for more details and link to the upgraded packages. Also, Red Hat has a Year 2000 Readiness Disclosure Statement that's worth a look.

Debian has a Y2K page that looks at packages and their compliance with the year 2000. "The near Y2K compliance of a system is meaningless if the failure of even a single non-Y2K compliant component causes your mission critical system to stop functioning." Look there if you want to verify your Debian system for Y2K compliance.

SuSE's Y2K page discusses why Linux is fundamentally safe from any Y2K problems, because of the time measurement scheme it shares with Unix. "A few SuSE Linux applications that stored 2-digit dates have already been repaired."

For the other distributions, check out their respective Web sites for more information. Although we are already in the year 2000, potential problems can still occur, so it's good policy to keep your distribution up-to-date.

As for you Windows users, good luck. :)

Jeff Alami (jeff@linux.com) admits it: he has no real life. When he's not working as the Editor-in-Chief of Linux.com, he's either sleeping or eating. Come to think of it, he doesn't spend much time sleeping or eating anyway.





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