Originally Published: Friday, 17 December 1999 Author: Dionne Saunders
Published to: featured_articles/Featured Articles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

The Linux Router Project

The Linux Router Project, or LRP for short, came to my attention from Charles Shapiro's phenomenal presentation about the project. He was the special guest speaker at the Atlanta Linux Enthusiasts meeting on December 9, 1999. The purpose of LRP is to have a Linux-based router and configure downline computers on a LAN to connect to it....

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The Linux Router Project, or LRP for short, came to my attention from Charles Shapiro's phenomenal presentation about the project. He was the special guest speaker at the Atlanta Linux Enthusiasts meeting on December 9, 1999. The purpose of LRP is to have a Linux-based router and configure downline computers on a LAN to connect to it.

With LRP, only the main Linux box or router will be connected to the Internet and the downline sets will share the Internet access from the LRP machine. LRP uses the Linux kernel's IP Masquerade features to shuffle packets of information to and from the client machine through the LRP and out to the Internet service provider.

It's easy and relatively inexpensive to build yourself a Linux Router Project system. The total cost could range between $60 to $150 for this project. For Charles Shapiro, his total cost was in the area of $60 to build his LRP.

As for hardware, the following is recommended: a 486, 16MB of RAM, a modem or network card for your Internet connection (this depends on whether the Internet connection is dial-up or network based, like cable modems), a network card to connect to downline machines, floppy drive, and client machines. A monitor and keyboard are needed to build the LRP. When the router is built and configured on the network, you can use telnet to log in to it and communicate to it from any PC on your LAN.

The entire Linux Router Project software can be downloaded onto a floppy disk. LRP software is made up of various files, including Package files and Modules. The largest file is the Root file and a PPP file is also included. Your Linux kernel will be loaded as part of LRP. Once you have your LRP disk, you insert it into the disk drive of the LRP machine and boot from the disk.

Here's what we do to make this operation run like a network should. If you're using a dial-up connection, you will want to connect your LRP machine to the Internet via PPP or SLIP. If you are wondering if this works with DSL or any other type of Internet connection, you will probably want to do more research before you get started. Once your LRP is connected to the Internet, it will be assigned a public IP address.

Let's say you have someone on one of the downline computers on the network that would also like to connect to the Internet also. The downline computer calls into the LRP machine and starts a PPP or SLIP connection. When the downline computer receives an IP address, it will be a private address. Since the downline computer will have its own private IP address, this adds some extra security to the downline computer.

Are you interested in more information pertaining to LRP? You can begin with going directly to Linux Router Project. There you will find good information and additional links. Also, there is Tom's Root Boot with mirror sites.

Dionne Saunders, saunders65@linux.com.





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