Originally Published: Monday, 14 February 2000 Author: Brandon Rich
Published to: corp_features/General Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

SCO Bridges Applications Gap with Tarantella

Many companies have a need for accessing Windows, UNIX and Mainframe applications over a network. Typically this would require a sizable amount of work to be performed on the server and client sides. This architecture creates many administration headaches. Moving the administration away from the client machines and to the server can typically save a tremendous amount of time.

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For many years there have been large gaps between the Windows, UNIX, and Mainframe systems. Many companies have a need for accessing Windows, UNIX and Mainframe applications over a network. Typically this would require a sizable amount of work to be performed on the server and client sides. This architecture creates many administration headaches. Moving the administration away from the client machines and to the server can typically save a tremendous amount of time.

Citrix has a product called MetaFrame that runs on a Windows NT or Windows 2000 server that can serve Windows applications to a Java enabled browser or a native client. Citrix has announced support for the Solaris operating system but still does not run on Linux nor can it serve Mainframe applications.

SCO to the rescue!

SCO by successfully reverse engineering the Microsoft RDP protocol (Remote Desktop Protocol) and creating a product called Tarantella is offering a product that allows a Linux server to serve Windows, UNIX as well as the legacy (TN3270) Mainframe applications. SCO has essentially moved the operating system to the network (NOS). This provides a seamless interface for users to access the applications served from various servers.

There is one thing to note here. Tarantella acts as a "application broker". This means that Tarantella uses a Windows server to serve up Windows applications, these applications are not served directly from the Tarantella server. This helps keep down the administration requirements. The Windows server does not need to have any third party software (such as Tarantella) installed on it. This is where a lot of problems can occur. Instead what SCO has done is left the application servers in tact and thus creating more stable servers. Clients will connect to the Tarantella server and access the Windows applications through it.

Tarantella can run on SCO OpenServer, UnixWare, Solaris, Compaq Tru64, IBM AIX, and HP-UX the Linux versions are on the way (Tarantella Express will be available next quarter and Tarantella II will be available the second half of this year). The supported flavors of Linux will be Red Hat Linux, TurboLinux, Caldera OpenLinux, and SuSE Linux. Tarantella can serve applications from any UNIX or Linux server but will be able to natively run on the distributions listed.

Why SCO?

SCO has long been a leader in the UNIX industry. They were behind the XENIX operating system and currently provide the SCO OpenServer and UnixWare operating systems. They have also teamed up with IBM and Intel to work on Project Monterey, which will be SCO's 64-bit UNIX operating system (www.projectmonterey.com). Needless to say SCO is not new to the UNIX arena. Are they new to \ Linux? Far from it! Last year they released lxrun, an application that allows Linux programs to run on SCO OpenServer or UnixWare. SCO has investments in Linux Mall, TurboLinux, and Caldera Systems. Support and consulting services for Linux are also available from SCO. They have contributed to the Linux community many times over.

So in what position does this history put SCO? This puts them in a perfect position to bridge the gap between Windows, UNIX, Linux as well as Mainframe systems. Typically corporations and even small companies run many different operating systems in their environment. This could prove to be more and more true as people start to migrate from the Windows world to the Linux community

Think about it, wouldn't it be nice for end users to be able to use applications without having to deal with differences between the servers? Wouldn't it be nice to have a Linux server running Tarantella that can serve Linux, UNIX, Windows and Mainframe applications? Since Tarantella can make use of a Java enabled browser there is absolutely nothing that needs administering on the client side, all administration can be done from the server side. This relieves a lot of headaches from network administrators.

SCO has offered a 10 for 1 license exchange for Citrix MetaFrame users. More information about the trade-in program can be found at http://tarantella.sco.com/info/tradein.html. More information about Tarantella can be found at http://tarantella.sco.com. Moving from MetaFrame to Tarantella will allow you to serve applications across many platforms rather than just Windows (or Solaris in the future).

SCO was founded in 1979 and went public on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange in 1993 under the symbol SCOC. Citrix was founded in 1989 and went public on the Nasdaq Stock Exchange in late 1995 under the symbol CTXS. ---





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