Originally Published: Friday, 4 February 2000 Author: Nico Lumma
Published to: interact_articles_jobs_profiles/Job Profiles Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

Getting paid to play Linux games

Imagine that you could play games all day long and get paid for it. It sounds like a college student's dream come true, and Andy Mecham certainly looks happy about his job.

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Imagine that you could play games all day long and get paid for it. It sounds like a college student's dream come true, and Andy Mecham certainly looks happy about his job. Andy (yoda@lokigames.com) is doing QA for Loki Games, the company that has ported such great titles like Myth II, Civilization: Call to Power and Quake 3 to Linux.

Andy and I sat down to have a little talk at the LWCE in New York, where he can be seen wearing a hockey jersey with a big Loki Games logo on it, playing Quake 3 at various booths.

Andy has been working with Loki since October and this is pretty much the time he started to really use Linux. His typical workday starts with reading email, newsgroups and Loki's bugtracking system (fenris.lokigames.com) to find out what new bugs have been reported. After that is done, Andy basically plays games for the rest of the day while trying to reproduce the bugs people reported. Andy has 5 different Linux boxes in his offices, so he can play the games with different hardware setups.

"We always resolve bugs!", Andy says, although he admits that it sometimes takes a while to fix everything. Getting feedback from the gamers is important in order for Andy to get his job done, but he also points out that some people can't distinguish between problems in a specific game and problems that result from the gamer's hardware or distributions.

Oftentimes Andy's workday ends with even more games when the Loki crew gets together for some games on the LAN.

Aside from working at Loki, Andy also studies Business Economics at UCLA, which means that on two days of the week he has to drive to L.A. from Tustin, where Loki is based, to attend classes. Andy ultimately wants to run his own Linux company in the future, but right now he is happy about having the best job a gamer can have.





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