Originally Published: Saturday, 16 September 2000 Author: Alex Pearsall
Published to: learn_articles_firststep/General Page: 1/1 - [Printable]

Learning to Samba - Part 1

All right! You've finally installed GNU/Linux on your own box at home, and you're ready to put this bad boy into action! But you don't happen to have the entire house running GNU/Linux. Maybe the wife's a bit reluctant, or the boss cant live without his Outlook Express. But you've installed GNU/Linux on the household/work server! Now people need file-sharing and other stuff! However, you're not panic stricken. When they ask what you are going to do about the situation, you very calmly, but slyly, say, "Samba, baby!"

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All right! You've finally installed GNU/Linux on your own box at home, and you're ready to put this bad boy into action! But you don't happen to have the entire house running GNU/Linux. Maybe the wife's a bit reluctant, or the boss cant live without his Outlook Express. But you've installed GNU/Linux on the household/work server! Now people need file-sharing and other stuff! However, you're not panic stricken. When they ask what you are going to do about the situation, you very calmly, but slyly, say, "Samba, baby!"

Yes, Samba! Samba is this very funky bit of software written by the Samba Team (www.samba.org). Samba uses the SMB (Server Message Block) open protocol to interface with platforms that support it natively (Windows NT, OS/2, GNU/Linux, Windows 95/98). Add-on's are available to VMS, Unix, Apple Mac's and all sorts of other platforms. But were not concerned with that at this moment. We are concerned with getting GNU/Linux to talk to Windows 9x/NT clients, and vice versa.

This part of this article will cover the basic installation of the Samba package, and assumes that you have a fully functional GNU/Linux system with a network set up and running smoothly. Otherwise, what I tell you just plain won't work!

First of, get the Samba tarball source package. We will be using source in this example for a couple of reasons. Source compiled to match your specific computer is always faster than binaries, and it's always more fun to feel all cool and technical when the compiling code scrolls by! Download the Samba source from: ftp://ftp.samba.org/pub/samba/samba-2.0.7.tar.gz.

After you download it, un-tar and gzip it by executing the command "tar -zxf samba-2.0.7.tar.gz". This will create a directory named samba-2.0.7 in whichever directory you downloaded the samba source to.

Now, as root, enter the samba-2.0.7/source directory. After a quick display of the files, run the configure script with the following command:

./configure

All sorts of funky looking stuff will scroll past your screen, as the scripts looks for library files and other dependencies. If you happened to get a error on a required library file, jot down the name and install it. If you have questions with that, ask me at rebelpacket@linux.com. If all goes well, after it is done "configuring" it will create a "Makefile" with instructions for compiling the software from source. To compile the source code, type "make". Relax now, go get a cup of coffee. This will take awhile. It took about 5-10 minutes on my dual processor box, so If you've got a slower Pentium computer, you might consider going out for lunch at your favorite Chinese buffet.

By default, this compilation/install will install in /usr/local/samba. You can specify where you want this by changing the "prefix" destination address in the makefile. Most people shouldn't need to touch this, but if you must tinker...

./ configure prefix=/usr/local/samba

Change the "/usr/local/samba" to where ever you want Samba to be installed. My suggestion is to keep the default.

If you need to install Samba on a RPM (Red Hat Package Manager) based distribution, you can just download the Samba rpm and run "rpm -Uvh ", and it will install Samba for you. Or, on a Debian system, you could use "apt-get install task-samba". Again, I'd suggest using the source, as it will be compiled for your specific architecture and probably run faster. Besides, the next part will be referencing the compilation/installion to /usr/local/samba, and NOT the RPM or Debian installs.

Next time, we will get it up and running for you!

Alex (rebelpacket@linux.com)





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