Originally Published: Thursday, 17 August 2000 Author: Jeff Alami and Rob Bos
Published to: featured_articles/Featured Articles Page: 1/1 - [Std View]

LinuxWorld Conference and Expo Report: Day Three

IBM, Dell, VA, Hewlett-Packard, Palm - all the big names are represented and throwing their weight behind Linux, and hard. IBM in particular has decided on Linux as the highest common denominator behind all their product lines, from S/390 to wristwatch.

IBM, Dell, VA, Hewlett-Packard, Palm - all the big names are represented and throwing their weight behind Linux, and hard. IBM in particular has decided on Linux as the highest common denominator behind all their product lines, from S390 to wristwatch; Dell has officially announced support for Linux on all their systems, so that you can simply choose to have it installed on the web-based order form. Sun is GPL'ing their StarOffice suite. Corel just released CorelDraw! for Linux. Ten percent of Dell servers shipped run Linux. Another estimated ten percent get it installed independently. The show floor is finally starting to get the idea and not firewalling machines up the wazoo, letting anyone walk up to a machine and websurf or ssh out. Debian potato is officially released. the Eazel project is making enormous headway in building a coherent, powerful desktop environment that doesn't compromise Linux's power for the sake of ease of use.

And what's more, this is only the very beginning - mainstream society has barely embraced computers, much less any specific type of computer. The information technology revolution is just beginning; get ready to see it ramp up a few notches over the next few years. Free software changes everything it touches.

Five thousand Debian "slink-and-a-half" CDs were distributed on the day that potato was released. Linux.com, slashdot.org, freshmeat.net, and several others were officially integrated into a hopefully independently funded entity called OSDN - all VA Research properties related to Linux community sites.

Stormix, creators of the Debian-based Storm Linux distribution, announced the release of Hail, their second edition of Storm Linux 2000, in three different versions: Starter, Deluxe, and Firewall. Why differentiate between Starter and Deluxe editions of Storm? Kevin Lindsay, the head developer of Stormix, explains that the Starter edition is just that: a version of Storm Linux for those who are just starting out with Linux. Starter makes it possible by charging less for the distribution boxed set, as well as providing only the basic packages to keep the system simple.

LinuxFund.org was present at the .org pavilion, touting their Tux-branded credit card. A percentage of the purchases made with this card will be given to open source projects. Who decides which projects get the money? You can now, thanks to LinuxFund.org's distribution system. Registered users on the site will collect "penguin pesos," which can be given to open source projects. LinuxFund.org will match the penguin pesos with real dollars.

The Linux Professional Institute continues with its distribution-agnostic, non-profit technical certification efforts. This week, LPI announced a Japanese translation of its courseware, with Japanese exams coming soon. Also, IBM's "Certified for E-Business" certification, which requires a technical prerequisite, has made LPI certification a qualified prerequisite for Linux experience. What differentiates LPI from other Linux certification efforts is that it isn't tied to any one distribution, any one company, or even any one set of courseware. "There should be freedom of choice in how you prepare for certification," says Dan York, one of the founders of the institute.