The Linux.com Article Database

Once upon a time, there was a great Linux community site called Linux.com. Every day on Linux.com, dozens of volunteers from the Linux community would spend many hours of their time writing new articles, moderating comments and generally keeping the site looking like a professional resource, attracting several hundred thousand page views each day.

Unfortunately, for various reasons, Linux.com no longer exists in that format, replaced instead with a mostly automated system that pulls content from elsewhere on the web.

One of the key things that made Linux.com great, however, was that the vast majority of content on the site was published under the Open Content License. This allows for anyone to reproduce the content for free, providing the terms of the license are met.

On that basis, I've decided to re-publish (almost) all of the items that were in the main Linux.com database at the point at which it ceased to publish new content (October 2001). This includes news items and internal Linux.com announcements as well as full length articles; basically anything that was in the news/article system.

This gives the volunteers a chance to find a copy of their work, and also keeps the content available for the rest of the Linux community to benefit from and away from the bit-bucket.

Thank you to all those who contributed to the site!

If you find an item that shouldn't be here, then please let me know

If you'd like to see how Linux.com used to look, Garrett LeSage (ex linux.com art director) has some Screenshots Online as part of his portfolio


At this point you can do one of three things to find old articles:
a) Search by Author(s)
b) Use the Category Browser
or c) use the Full Text Search below.

Full Text Search

Search String:
Tick this box to search articles as well as titles


Article-o-matic

Software That Linux Needs
Linux has a plethora of outstanding software already available. On the server side we have the world's most popular Web server, software enabling file and print services to every major platform, and some of the most respected database products on the market. Linux also touts some wonderful desktop applications such as the GIMP, various capable office suites like StarOffice and ApplixWare, and one of the world's top web browsers, Netscape. All of this great software, yet Linux is still missing some key products which it needs to further its penetration not only as a corporate desktop, but also as a home user operating system.... (2/Sep/1999 - 4823 bytes)
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